Spray Drying for Effective Drug Delivery

Time: 11:30 am - 11:50 am

Date: 30 April 2019

30-april-2019 11:30 30-april-2019 11:50 Europe/London Spray Drying for Effective Drug Delivery

Spray drying is a fast-growing technology in the pharmaceutical industry for producing dry powder formulations. It is gaining momentum over other established techniques, such as freeze-drying, due to the faster processing times, ease of scale up and the semi-continuous manufacturing processes. During spray drying, a dry powder is formed when a liquid feed is atomised… Read more »

Making Pharmaceuticals

Synopsis

Spray drying is a fast-growing technology in the pharmaceutical industry for producing dry powder formulations. It is gaining momentum over other established techniques, such as freeze-drying, due to the faster processing times, ease of scale up and the semi-continuous manufacturing processes. During spray drying, a dry powder is formed when a liquid feed is atomised and rapidly dried in a hot air stream. Particles from 1-50 µm can be easily produced, and particle properties engineered for the desired applications, including nasal, pulmonary and oral drug delivery.
Spray drying has been used to improve the stability of biologics, such as virosomes, proteins and enzymes, without any loss of activity, which can eliminate the need for cold-chain storage. For MACIVIVA, a Horizon 2020 project, virosomes have been spray dried into a powder for vaccination by the nasal route. The powder shows greatly superior stability to the liquid product when stored frozen or at 40°C/75%RH, and when delivered to rats via an APTAR nasal spray device provoke an immune response comparable to that induced by sub-cutaneous delivery.
Oral bioavailability of poorly-soluble APIs can be increased by spray drying with polymers. In collaboration with Xenogesis and Axis Bio Services, spray drying raloxifene with PVP K-12 resulted in a 7-fold increase in oral bioavailability in a preclinical study.
Spray drying can also be used for particle engineering, to optimise particle size, morphology, and encapsulate particles. Pulmonary drug delivery requires 1 – 5 µm particles, but these are notoriously difficult to collect on scale up. Upperton have successfully applied fluid energy milling to spray dried powders to overcome this challenge achieving aerodynamic performance and fine particle fraction ideal for pulmonary delivery.
These case studies illustrate the versatility of spray drying as a formulation technology, producing dry powder formulations of APIs for effective drug delivery.

Speakers

  • Laura Mason Director of Business Operations - Upperton Pharma Solutions

« Back